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HomeHome And AwayPoignant on-set moment for grieving Home and Away star Jessica Redmayne after...

Poignant on-set moment for grieving Home and Away star Jessica Redmayne after family heartbreak

One celebrity on Wednesday’s episode of Home and Away has a very special meaning attached to a secret moment.

Actress Jessica Redmayne’s father Paul is scheduled to make an unexpected cameo in a fleeting moment that will be especially meaningful for the family.

On October 19, Jessica bid her cherished mother Christine, who courageously battled the “invisible” illness of dementia for nine years, farewell.

Because of the family’s suffering, her father’s TV appearance has much more significance.

Jessica posted a number of pictures of Paul on set on Facebook and informed her family and friends about her dad’s cameo.

It’s the big night! The screen will be shared by TWO Redmaynes, not just one. She stated, “Get ready to pay close attention to who is sipping a tea behind Harper’s head when you see Alf ordering coffee from Irene.”

“Home & Away, Channel 7, tonight at 7 p.m.”

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In pictures, Paul was seen grinning with Shane Withington, Ray Meagher, Georgie Parker, Lynne McGranger, and Ally Harris.

Before the programme aired, Jessica talked to 7Life and stated, “It’s not every day you get to bring your own Dad to Summer Bay!

“Having him on set with me and showing him my work life was such a joy.”

In pictures, Paul was seen grinning with Shane Withington, Ray Meagher, Georgie Parker, Lynne McGranger, and Ally Harris.

Before the programme aired, Jessica talked to 7Life and stated, “It’s not every day you get to bring your own Dad to Summer Bay!

“Having him on set with me and showing him my work life was such a joy.”

She was the most diligent person I’ve ever met and would sacrifice anything for everyone.

“She is without a doubt the reason I am who I am.

She constantly inspired me to aim high and had confidence in my ability to succeed in anything I set my mind to.

“She used to tell me good night, love you, and don’t forget every night when I was a young child.

Maybe that was her way of telling me ahead of time that even if her memory had taken her away from us in her latter years, she would always remember how much she loved us.

“Good night, Mum. I love you. Please remember x.”

Her eulogy concluded with the words, “Christine Rosalie Redmayne, 16.05.1953 – 19.10.2023.”

According to Dementia Australia, dementia refers to a group of symptoms brought on by brain illnesses, the most prevalent of which is Alzheimer’s disease.

Memory loss, forgetfulness, speech difficulties, and mood swings are typical symptoms.

During an interview on The Morning Show in September, Jessica talked more about her mother’s tale.

“My mother’s younger onset dementia was identified in 2014, but she had symptoms for many years prior, most likely when I was 17 or 18,” the mother stated.

Her mother had started exhibiting symptoms at the age of 55, but at the time, she was 61.

“I’ve frequently said to folks that dementia is like moving backwards in that scenario—it’s kind of like a toddler going through stages.

“We noticed personality changes in her along with forgetting basic things like how to use cutlery and get dressed.”

Jessica recalled that it was “difficult, but in the face of adversity, you just kind of do what you have to do to help them, and so I would learn to better adapt to her” during the early stages of her mother’s illness.

The actress claimed that during her mother’s last four years, Jessica “just kind of got used to” the fact that her mother “didn’t recognise anyone anymore.”

Jessica hopes to disseminate the idea that “it’s about creating a dementia-friendly community because I think that dementia can be quite invisible as a disease” in her capacity as an ambassador for Dementia Australia.

She remarked, “I used to accompany my mum to the disabled restrooms a lot, and I felt awkward about it since she wasn’t old and didn’t seem to be in any pain, but she was losing her ability to use the restroom on her own.

“I think it’s kind of awareness and respect, that wider awareness for people and kindness and knowing that if someone seems wrong, then something is wrong,” the speaker said.

The group estimates that over 400,000 Australians are suffering with dementia at the moment.

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