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HomeHome And AwayHome and Away's Marilyn sparks big trouble for Logan after diagnosis

Home and Away’s Marilyn sparks big trouble for Logan after diagnosis

Marilyn Chambers of Home and Away will soon cause problems for doctor Logan Bennett when she jeopardises his medical profession owing to her changing behaviour.

Marilyn (Emily Symons) has been acting strangely and out of character since she was poisoned by a chemical during the gas assault on Salt, causing her loved ones tremendous anxiety.

According to TV Week, Leah Patterson-Baker (Ada Nicodemou) and Irene Roberts (Lynne McGranger) will continue to attempt to aid their buddy in scenes set to broadcast this week in Australia, and they have agreed to keep checking in on her.

When Irene visits Marilyn to check how she is doing, she discovers Marilyn blaring music and enjoying a party by herself. She tells Irene that she’s celebrating her major decision: she’s quitting her job at the Diner and launching her own tarot-card reading booth outside the Bait Shop.

Marilyn explodes in an uncommon wrath at Irene because she can’t help but chuckle at her impulsive decision.

When Logan (Harley Bonner) passes Marilyn’s booth, he decides to take advantage of the chance to conduct a covert evaluation of her condition by sitting down for a tarot reading. He quickly realises that her altered behaviour is not related to neurological causes, but rather to psychological factors.

Unfortunately, the issue worsens when Marilyn files a formal complaint against Logan, which might jeopardise his employment. Will Marilyn pursue her lawsuit against Logan?

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These scenes will appear in Australia this week and in the UK early next year on Home and Away.

Emily Symons recently admitted that portraying such a different version of Marilyn on the programme has been “the most hard thing” she has had to do on the show, saying that she has had to portray such a different version of the character she has known for so long.

“It’s a completely different Marilyn,” she explained, “which has been incredibly difficult to portray since she’s become second nature to me now.” “Having to build a new [version of the] character all of a sudden… certain days I was like, ‘I can’t say that – it’s so nasty.’ But I needed to go there in order for the plot to function.”

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